South East Coast

Does Patients' Perception of Improvement following a Pain Management Programme, Match Reported Minimally Clinically Important Differences?

Clinical outcomes for patients attending a pain management programme were evaluated to determine whether patients who rated an improvement on a Global Impression of Change Score, achieved mean changes in BPI that were consistent with 'acceptable' change, and to determine mean changes on other outcomes in this population. It is suggested that a mean change of 2.09 in pain interference, as measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), could be considered acceptable to patients. Currently data is unavailable for changes in pain acceptance.

Recorded Physiotherapy Webinars: Innovative provision of CPD to Physiotherapists working in busy independent sector, MSK clinical environments.

The purpose of this service evaluation was to help better understand the impact and value of running a Recorded Physiotherapy Webinar (RPW) programme to Nuffield Health Physiotherapists.

RPW's are a series of 20-40 minute presentations recorded with both visuals (PowerPoint) and audio (presenter's voice). They are delivered by subject matter experts from across Nuffield Health and aim to promote learning on clinical topics (i.e. ACL rehabilitation, Shoulder red-flags and Cervicogenic headaches).

A total of 14 self-selected RPW's are currently available and can be accessed from anywhere, at any time after the recording via a Learning Management System (LMS).

The effectiveness of circuit training on physical ability in palliative care.

Exercise and physical activity is increasingly being encouraged with palliative care patients due to emerging evidence suggesting the physical and psychosocial benefits to patients. This small, local audit analyses the changes in physical outcome measures of a group of patients undertaking a weekly circuit exercise group.

Managing complexity in a rare condition: A single case report of novel forearm tendon transfers for Inclusion Body Myositis

Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an acquired, inflammatory myopathy presenting in the over 50┬┤s. Characterised with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in the quadriceps and long finger flexors. Currently, this complex health problem, that has a prevalence of 5-10 per million, does not have an effective treatment or cure, therefore forearm tendon transfers provide a viable option to address finger weakness in suitable patients. The marked finger flexor weakness poses a significant limitation to patients┬┤ quality of life and functional abilities.

This case demonstrates how physiotherapists can be pivotal in managing complex and challenging conditions through multi-disciplinary team (MDT) working, demonstrating how our roles evolve in response to complex cases.

Assessing the impact of Physiotherapy Training on Emotional Wellbeing.

1 in 4 people experience mental health problems in any given year, 1 in 6 experience work related stress, depression or anxiety. Only 25% of those experiencing emotional distress seek and receive treatment, with many being dependent on the informal support of family or colleagues.

Physiotherapists are also encouraged to investigate Biopsychosocial issues with their patients, through management of persistent pain conditions and may not feel equipped to successfully interpret or manage the information that they receive from the patient. This additional stress can also impact on the Physiotherapists emotional wellbeing and have an impact on patient care.

The aim of this project was to ensure that all Physiotherapists have an appropriate level of emotional literacy so that they are able read/notice the signs of emotional distress in themselves and others and then act appropriately to support themself and others.

Physiotherapy Direct Self-Referral to improve patient access to MSk Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy self-referral has risen over the last 2 years in our hospital trust to almost 50%. As referral numbers have increased so has the ways in which people can access the service. The purpose of the evaluation was to examine the way in which people access the self referral service with a view to improving the efficiency of the service, the ease of access for patients as well as ensuring a fair and safe service.

Learning needs analysis of spinal specialist triage practitioners

The South East London and Kent Regional Spinal Network (RSN) aims to provide evidenced-based pathways for management of musculoskeletal spinal conditions from first point of contact through to tertiary care. From 1st April 2018 all non-emergency referrals to secondary care (Pain and Spinal Surgery) must be referred by Spinal Specialist Triage Practitioners (SSTP). GP referrals will not be accepted. This aligns with the National Back Pain Pathway (NBPP) and NICE CG59 guidelines towards improving spinal care, equity of services and commissioning of spine care across the region. SSTPs, predominantly physiotherapists by background, are multidisciplinary (e.g. osteopaths, nurses) and work in primary or secondary care or in interface services run by NHS and Any Qualified Providers (AQP).

There have been calls for the development of a regional training programme and in the long-term, a nationally recognised qualification, to support SSTPs and promote excellent patient care. Current provision of training is fragmented and learning needs unknown. A learning needs analysis is required to allow for development of future training and development.

There are no validated learning needs questionnaires suitable for the specific purpose therefore a comprehensive tool was required.

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