South Central

A Physiotherapist in the Paediatric Haemophilia Clinic at University Hospital Southampton: - Patient and Family Satisfaction

Previous to September 2016 paediatric haemophilia patients at Southampton Children's Hospital were seen within the general outpatient caseload of a band 7 Paediatric Physiotherapist.

As a result:

  • The children did not have timely accessibility to physiotherapy
  • There was a high rate of was not brought (WNB) as physiotherapy appointments were extra to clinic appointments therefore requiring a separate visit.
  • The children were not seen from their diagnosis, therefore often did not meet the therapist until age 4 when a Haemophilia Joint Health Score could be performed.

In September 2016 a physiotherapist started to attend the Paediatric Haemophilia Clinic. 

The purpose of this review is to evaluate patient/ family satisfaction with the introduction of a physiotherapist into the monthly clinic. Each Family were also asked 'what it means to each family having a physiotherapist in clinic?'

Referral from primary care musculoskeletal services to Accident and Emergency for suspected cauda equine syndrome

Cauda equine syndrome (CES) is a medical emergency, requiring immediate referral for investigation and early surgical decompression for a favourable outcome (1). Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust (SHFT) musculoskeletal services manage suspected CES with immediate referral to accident and emergency (A&E) at the University of Southampton NHS Trust (UHS) where urgent imaging and surgical decompression can take place.

This evaluation aimed to describe the demographics and clinical features of referred patients, plus summarise the medical management and clinical outcome following A&E examination.

Stroke rehabilitation quality improvement plan

Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust (OHFT) committed to a Stroke Quality Improvement (QI) Project to enhance the quality of rehabilitation for patients on the Oxfordshire Stroke Pathway. Following poor performance in the national indicators Sentinel Stroke National Audit Program (SSNAP) and local Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), the Stroke Quality meeting was initiated by the physiotherapy team to review care and develop a multi-professional improvement plan. Aligning service provision with that recommended in the 2016 Royal College of Physicians National Stroke Guidelines required consolidation of two stroke units, 14 miles apart, into one specialist stroke rehabilitation ward. This abstract outlines key objectives of the QI project, describe progress to date, and evaluates the impact on quality delivery and patient outcomes so far. The objective is to share positive experiences and challenges encountered during the project.

Preparing the workforce for frailty in primary and community healthcare

The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary assessment that identifies the medical, psychosocial, and functional needs of older people. This service evaluation considers the impact of training allied health professionals (AHPs) and community nurses to undertake a CGA assessment in primary and community settings.

The Hierarchical Assessment of Balance and Mobility (HABAM) tool

Impaired mobility and balance correlate strongly with an individual's function and overall state of health. The Hierarchical Assessment of Balance and Mobility (HABAM) is a graphic and rapid assessment of balance and mobility originally designed for use within the hospitalised elderly. The measure has been used predominantly within frail elderly populations; however the aims of this study were to assess the utility of the HABAM to an elective orthopaedic population.

Can Emergency Care Therapies Help to Prevent Avoidable Admissions in the Emergency Department?

The Department of Heath estimate that 62% of hospital bed days are occupied by patients over the age of 65. Of these bed days 2.7 million are occupied by patients no longer needing or not requiring acute care in the first place. Of those who are admitted unnecessarily, the Emergency Department (ED) is often where the decision to admit is made. Furthermore, the longer a patient spends in the ED the longer their associated inpatient stay in the hospital will likely be, with the risk of losing up to 5% of their muscle strength per day.

During May and June 2016 the Emergency Care Improvement Programme (ECIP) reviewed Urgent and Emergency Care at Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital (BNHH). This was due to reduced ED performance. BNHH did not have an established dedicated Therapy team in ED, despite national evidence and ECIP recommendations. Therapies are well placed in ED to facilitate early patient discharge and help prevent admission of patients who do not require acute hospital care. The project aimed to eliminate avoidable non-medical admissions to inpatient base ward beds in patients over 65 years presenting to ED at BNHH by September 2017.

How do you meet the HCPC and CSP standards and regulations and could you evidence it?

The primary objective for sharing our activity via a Special Interest Report is to illustrate the need for independent measurable compliance of all physiotherapy services against HCPC and CSP Regulations and Standards.

Currently the HCPC re registration focus is on continuous professional development and the Care Quality Commission does not have jurisdiction to regulate standalone physiotherapy services: Therefore, all other regulatory checking is undertaken and reliant on the individual alone. The secondary objective of is to encourage physiotherapists to consider in depth and ensure they appreciate what are they stating, what they agree they are doing when they reregister and sign to state that they comply with all standards and regulations? Could auditing prove that this was the case and, if not, then why are they signing?

The Impact of a Physiotherapist in the Role of Clinical Matron within a Stroke Service

To explore the impact of putting senior clinicians at the bedside with clinical expertise in their speciality to improve quality of patient care. This role was introduced at Hampshire Hospitals Foundation Trust (HHFT) in 2016, whilst mainly undertaken by senior nurses, 2 physiotherapists and an occupational therapist have also undertaken the role. This presentation explores the impact of physiotherapists undertaking such roles.

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