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The Greenwich Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme: a virtual delivery model & a QI project

The Greenwich Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) Service consists of 0.1 WTE team lead, 1.0 WTE band 6 split between 2 part time staff, a fixed term 3 month contract band 5 physiotherapist and 1.0 WTE rehab assistant.

The driver behind the project was to address the issue of the suspension of our face to face supervised PR classes (4 sessions per week at local leisure centres) during the COVID pandemic. With a mounting waiting list and an expectation that we would not be able to return to business as usual, we had to adapt.

Our primary objective was to design a programme that was effective, safe and that patients would enjoy.

A secondary objective alongside the Oxleas QI team was to increase patient completion rates over a 3 year period.

Current completion rates for the Greenwich Pulmonary Rehab programme was low at 40%.

The end point of the project was to be able to confidently offer increased patient choice on how to access PR.

There is an ongoing national challenge to manage patient drop out rates, which are multifactorial in nature. The redesign and delivery of a virtual programme could address problems such as: difficulties travelling to the class, poor weather conditions and psychological challenges where patients feel unable to leave their home to attend.

Maximising impact of gait analysis reports on non-surgical management of children with neurodisability.

Instrumented gait analysis (IGA) impacts clinical decision-making in orthopaedic management planning for ambulant children with neurodisability (CwND). Studies shown that IGA influences paediatric surgery planning, but clarity on paediatric physiotherapy practice impact is sparse. Physiotherapists play an important role in helping ambulant CwND fulfil functional potential through management of walking ability, gait improvement training, equipment and post-operative gait rehabilitation but possibly under-use IGA. The study aim was to improve utilisation of IGA reports in inter-disciplinary management of CwND.

Goal-Directed and person-centred Rehabilitation for spasticity post-stroke and brain injury.

Stroke and brain injury-survivors have difficulty controlling muscles and in many cases, 'tightness' of muscles called spasticity. Spasticity is often painful, akin to muscle-cramp. It can limit mobility and independence and cause distressing complications of contractures, skin breakdown and pressure sores.

The aim of this work was to development a preliminary model 'goal-Directed and person-centred Rehabilitation (Direct-Rehab)', to link clinical decision making for patient centred treatment, with the goals and process of treatment. This requires a focus on linking physical rehabilitation treatments (often in combination with pharmacological treatments such as botulinum toxin) to person-centred goals.

Description of performance and functional trajectory of acute oncology inpatients at a London tertiary centre.

Advances in cancer care and its treatment mean that people living with a cancer diagnosis are living longer but not necessarily living well. It is reported that cancer patients present with multifaceted symptom burden that often impacts on physical performance.

At present exemplar models of cancer rehabilitation exist across the UK along with tumour and symptoms rehabilitation guidance in the form of NCAT Rehabilitation Pathways (National Cancer Action Team, Macmillian Cancer Support 2013). Implementation of these rehabilitation pathways into the inpatient setting can be challenging due to the multifactorial nature and interplay of symptoms cancer patients present with and the resources available.

Our local study primarily aimed to understand the functional trajectory of our acute inpatient population in order to determine how the cancer rehabilitation of the acute population can be optimised in future proposed work.

Key study aims:

  • To describe the acute inpatient oncology population
  • To describe the performance and functional trajectory of the acute inpatient oncology population
  • To feed into a wider project supported by fit for the future looking at “how do we optimise rehabilitation in acute oncology inpatients”

Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression - A Retrospective Audit of Current Practice on Medical Oncology and Haematology Wards at GSTT

Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency that requires efficient and effective diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation (NICE 2008).

 

The current MSCC quality standards for adults highlight the need for:

  • Early detection of MSCC through appropriate assessment by MSCC Co-ordinator, spinal surgeon and clinical oncologist, and imaging within 24 hours.
  • Treatment (dexamethasone, radiotherapy, surgery) commencement within 24 hours of confirmed diagnosis
  • Timely rehabilitation and discharge planning with patient and family input

 

The aim of this audit is to:

  • Determine whether the multidisciplinary team (MDT) management of MSCC patients meets national (NICE 2008) and local (KHP, 2016) guidelines at Guys and St Thomas Foundation Trust (GSTT)
  • To identify if and where improvements need to be made against both national and local guidance.
  • To assess components of the care pathway for timeliness, clinical decisions and processes – namely referrals to clinical oncologists, neuro/spinal surgeon, access to timely imaging, prescribing a suitable dexamethasone dose, timely treatment decisions, confirming spinal stability status and referral to rehabilitation services with provision of timely rehabilitation.

The Active Back Programme - A model for multidisciplinary persistent lower back pain rehabilitation.

The RNOH Active Back Programme (ABP) is a residential multi-disciplinary rehabilitation programme for people with persistent lower back pain. The aims of the ABP are to decrease the effects of pain on lifestyle by facilitating behavioural change through building self-efficacy and confidence. The long term goal is to reduce healthcare utilisation and hence the economic burden of back pain. Recent emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of targeting patient-specific fear avoidance. This shift in approach has significantly impacted the outcomes that therapy can achieve in terms of pain reduction and disability.

The purpose of this evaluation was to gauge the short-term outcomes at three months following completion of the ABP using measures of self-efficacy, confidence and physical capacity.

Service evaluation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Induction Clinic (ACLD) and Rehabilitation Class.

Historically, at GSTFT, patients with ACL pathology have been managed in weekly exercise classes. Anecdotally, Physiotherapists felt that they were unable to effectively manage both the post-operative and ACL deficient (ACLD) populations due to high class numbers. After an internal service evaluation and audit, a unique ACLD pathway was established to separate the ACLD population, and better manage both ACL cohorts. This included a specific fortnightly ACLD Induction Clinic and ACLD rehabilitation class.

This data collection aimed to:

  • Evaluate the demand for the ACLD pathway, including the new ACLD rehabilitation class, and analyse patient demographics
  • Ensure the ACLD pathway is utilised correctly, by monitoring patients being referred
  • Start analyzing the data and trends of patient attendance and onward management in the ACLD rehabilitation class and begin early root cause analysis.
  • Commence a systematic review around the quality of pre-operative physiotherapy intervention and how this effects outcomes post-operatively, in order to guide the temporality and content of our ACLD rehabilitation class.

Improving information-giving to critical care patients to guide post discharge rehabilitation: a quality improvement project

ICU survivors have a 1-year mortality rate of 30%, and a reduced quality of life associated with post-ICU syndrome; a triad of cognitive decline, physical weakness and psychiatric disorders. Early rehabilitation improves outcomes, leading to greater independence. The NICE CG83 guidelines instruct the provision of rehabilitation information to critical care patients on discharge. Currently, only a third of UK trusts meet these guidelines.

Within 20 weeks, we aimed to achieve 100% patient and therapist satisfaction with the rehabilitation information given to patients at risk of physical morbidity on discharge from critical care at Medway Maritime hospital.

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