Research, quality improvement and implementation approaches

The Greenwich Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programme: a virtual delivery model & a QI project

The Greenwich Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) Service consists of 0.1 WTE team lead, 1.0 WTE band 6 split between 2 part time staff, a fixed term 3 month contract band 5 physiotherapist and 1.0 WTE rehab assistant.

The driver behind the project was to address the issue of the suspension of our face to face supervised PR classes (4 sessions per week at local leisure centres) during the COVID pandemic. With a mounting waiting list and an expectation that we would not be able to return to business as usual, we had to adapt.

Our primary objective was to design a programme that was effective, safe and that patients would enjoy.

A secondary objective alongside the Oxleas QI team was to increase patient completion rates over a 3 year period.

Current completion rates for the Greenwich Pulmonary Rehab programme was low at 40%.

The end point of the project was to be able to confidently offer increased patient choice on how to access PR.

There is an ongoing national challenge to manage patient drop out rates, which are multifactorial in nature. The redesign and delivery of a virtual programme could address problems such as: difficulties travelling to the class, poor weather conditions and psychological challenges where patients feel unable to leave their home to attend.

Maximising impact of gait analysis reports on non-surgical management of children with neurodisability.

Instrumented gait analysis (IGA) impacts clinical decision-making in orthopaedic management planning for ambulant children with neurodisability (CwND). Studies shown that IGA influences paediatric surgery planning, but clarity on paediatric physiotherapy practice impact is sparse. Physiotherapists play an important role in helping ambulant CwND fulfil functional potential through management of walking ability, gait improvement training, equipment and post-operative gait rehabilitation but possibly under-use IGA. The study aim was to improve utilisation of IGA reports in inter-disciplinary management of CwND.

Goal-Directed and person-centred Rehabilitation for spasticity post-stroke and brain injury.

Stroke and brain injury-survivors have difficulty controlling muscles and in many cases, 'tightness' of muscles called spasticity. Spasticity is often painful, akin to muscle-cramp. It can limit mobility and independence and cause distressing complications of contractures, skin breakdown and pressure sores.

The aim of this work was to development a preliminary model 'goal-Directed and person-centred Rehabilitation (Direct-Rehab)', to link clinical decision making for patient centred treatment, with the goals and process of treatment. This requires a focus on linking physical rehabilitation treatments (often in combination with pharmacological treatments such as botulinum toxin) to person-centred goals.

Interprofessional education for practice: moving and handling for people with complex needs in contemporary healthcare.

Obesity is a growing problem in the UK affecting all areas of the NHS, with over a quarter of all adults falling into this category. The additional risks and co-mobidities that obesity is linked with leads to a high number of hospital admissions.

The multidisciplinary teams working with these people require appropriate knowledge and skills to deliver safe and effective care, with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2014) recommending that staff be appropriately trained to use specialist equipment when working with this complex group of people.

Research has shown that interprofessional team working can play an important part in improving patient safety. This report details the process an interprofessional team have undertaken to develop a simulated bariatric scenario as part of the learning materials that complement practical moving and handling sessions for undergraduate students.

The role of Men's Sheds in promoting the physical and mental well-being of older men.

The active and healthy ageing agenda challenges the perception that old age is a negative experience and recognises the positive contributions that older adults can make to their communities. However, successful ageing in place requires community-based support for older adults that facilitates social participation, independence and being active. Older men are less likely to join community groups where they can develop social ties and less gender specific support services are available for them.

Men's Sheds (MiS) is an initiative that aims to mitigate this by fostering the building of social networks between older men by providing social space for them to meet and undertake physical activities such as woodwork or metalwork.

The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of MiS on the physical health and mental well-being of the attendees.

Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression - A Retrospective Audit of Current Practice on Medical Oncology and Haematology Wards at GSTT

Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency that requires efficient and effective diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation (NICE 2008).

 

The current MSCC quality standards for adults highlight the need for:

  • Early detection of MSCC through appropriate assessment by MSCC Co-ordinator, spinal surgeon and clinical oncologist, and imaging within 24 hours.
  • Treatment (dexamethasone, radiotherapy, surgery) commencement within 24 hours of confirmed diagnosis
  • Timely rehabilitation and discharge planning with patient and family input

 

The aim of this audit is to:

  • Determine whether the multidisciplinary team (MDT) management of MSCC patients meets national (NICE 2008) and local (KHP, 2016) guidelines at Guys and St Thomas Foundation Trust (GSTT)
  • To identify if and where improvements need to be made against both national and local guidance.
  • To assess components of the care pathway for timeliness, clinical decisions and processes – namely referrals to clinical oncologists, neuro/spinal surgeon, access to timely imaging, prescribing a suitable dexamethasone dose, timely treatment decisions, confirming spinal stability status and referral to rehabilitation services with provision of timely rehabilitation.

Increasing long-term participation in sports based activities in children and young people with acquired brain injury.

Participation in sports can play a key role in a child’s quality of life, development and learning (Willis, 2018). Children and young people (CYP) with acquired brain injury (ABI) face significant barriers in accessing sporting and leisure activities.  This reduces the likelihood of participation in regular sporting and leisure activities (Anaby,2018),  both in the recovery period and the later stages (Willis, 2018).

This is a quality improvement project that explores the implementation of a sports based group in a neurorehabilitation centre for CYP with ABI.

Redesign of NHS Forth Valley´s Community Rehabilitation AHP Single Point of Referral.

NHS Forth Valley Community AHP services have redesigned how they deal with referrals received into their services. Until recently, point of receipt of referrals was purely administrative, with staff signposting to various parts of service that are delivered. Referrals that were deemed “inappropriate” were often lost in the system; there was no cognisance of how these “inappropriate” referrals should be dealt with. There was no understanding of time spent dealing with these queries. We redesigned the service, 'going live' in November 2018, to bring clinical staff into SPR, triaging the referrals received using a Personal Outcomes Approach and have reduced the number of referrals going forwards for intervention at the rehab teams, and increased signposting and self management in the community. This has had a knock on effect to reducing waiting times and enabled a more specific and tailored approach to those requiring rehabilitation in the community.

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