Innovations

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Innovations - quality assured physiotherapy initiatives

Our quality assured examples of successful initiatives aim to promote physiotherapy as an innovative and cost effective approach to improving patient pathways and promoting public health. We welcome examples and case studies from all aspects of physiotherapy practice, research, education, and service delivery.

You can either filter the innovations by 'Region' or 'Type' or use the keyword search above to find specific words or phrases. 

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Assessing the impact of Physiotherapy Training on Emotional Wellbeing.

1 in 4 people experience mental health problems in any given year, 1 in 6 experience work related stress, depression or anxiety. Only 25% of those experiencing emotional distress seek and receive treatment, with many being dependent on the informal support of family or colleagues.

Physiotherapists are also encouraged to investigate Biopsychosocial issues with their patients, through management of persistent pain conditions and may not feel equipped to successfully interpret or manage the information that they receive from the patient. This additional stress can also impact on the Physiotherapists emotional wellbeing and have an impact on patient care.

The aim of this project was to ensure that all Physiotherapists have an appropriate level of emotional literacy so that they are able read/notice the signs of emotional distress in themselves and others and then act appropriately to support themself and others.

Lung ultrasound in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis: A literature review

Adults and children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF) are regularly exposed to ionising radiation, from chest radiographs (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). This poses an issue as life expectancy has increased into the fifth decade of life.

Lung ultrasound (LUS) has the ability to assess many lung pathologies experienced in CF with accuracy close to CT but without the exposure to ionising radiation. The purpose of this review is to explore the literature to establish if LUS is being used to aid the management of patients with CF.

The use of a standardised outcome measure within the Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Services across a Trust in Staffordshire

Musculoskeletal (MSK) physiotherapy teams within Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (MPFT) historically used a variety of outcome measures including the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) alongside condition specific PROMS and a patient experience-reported experience measure, in line with Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) recommendations. However, teams used different outcome measures and data collection, inputting and analysis methods varied considerably.

In 2017, the MSK Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) was introduced and a data inputting and analysis calculator was developed following a consensus group exercise with the clinical and operational leads of MSK physiotherapy teams to facilitate the implementation of the MSK-HQ.

The effects of a new Tendo-Achilles Pathway (TAP) on an orthopaedic department.

Achilles tendinopathy is a common pathology that is considered difficult to treat. At a time of austerity in the NHS it is essential to have carefully designed pathways that are monitored in terms of cost and effectiveness. However, a paucity of evidence exists for what the “best value” dedicated “joined up” pathway of care is for this difficult condition. Design, implement and evaluate the impact of a new therapist lead pathway for Tendon- Achilles Pain (TAP).

Managing complexity in a rare condition: A single case report of novel forearm tendon transfers for Inclusion Body Myositis

Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an acquired, inflammatory myopathy presenting in the over 50´s. Characterised with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in the quadriceps and long finger flexors. Currently, this complex health problem, that has a prevalence of 5-10 per million, does not have an effective treatment or cure, therefore forearm tendon transfers provide a viable option to address finger weakness in suitable patients. The marked finger flexor weakness poses a significant limitation to patients´ quality of life and functional abilities.

This case demonstrates how physiotherapists can be pivotal in managing complex and challenging conditions through multi-disciplinary team (MDT) working, demonstrating how our roles evolve in response to complex cases.

Priming elderly patients for surgery - the development of a pre-operative service for frail elderly patients

The Peri-operative Review Informing Management of the Elderly (PRIME) Clinic was developed in response to the increasingly frail population undergoing complex major surgery. Due to this, it was recognised that clinicians with advanced skills were required to manage and optimise this patient group pre-operatively, which led to the formation of a multi-disciplinary team consisting of consultant geriatricians, consultant anaesthetists, a senior physiotherapist and a senior occupational therapist. The aim of the team was to optimise patients from a medical, physical and social viewpoint.

The focus of physiotherapy input was to increase physical activity pre-operatively, improve respiratory function and identify falls risks in order to contribute to a reduction in post -op length of stay and improve patient function.

This service evaluation demonstrates the benefit of a highly specialised MDT model with frail elderly elective surgery patients.

Integrating Physiotherapy into an Adult Social Care Occupational Therapy service.

The Occupational Therapy (OT) service at Leicester City Council (LCC) faced some difficulties when they were working with a person who required Physiotherapy (PT) input in the community. Namely the long waitlist for input and an inability to establish a person’s baseline level of mobility when this was needed before recommending care packages, equipment or adaptations. The impacts on LCC were an increased need for formal care, equipment and adaptations as well as increases in OT staff’s workloads and/or delays in picking up new cases. Additionally, the cost to the person is highlighted as delays in accessing PT input can lead to further deterioration in their abilities (dependence) and/or the need to wait longer for equipment/ adaptations which may put them at risk.

The Front of House Team: Enabling and Supporting Discharge from the Emergency Department.

There is an increasing strain being placed all across the NHS systems. Emergency Departments up and down the country are being widely criticised for their performance against the national targets. We also have an aging population often with multiple co-morbidities that often present to the emergency department with both health issues and social care issues. The Royal Stoke Emergency department is one of the busiest in the country. In 2018 it had 111,091 attendances. 30,074. It had a higher than national average attendance to admission rate for over the age of 70. An external body wanted to see if creating a new MDT made up of senior decision makers with a background in the care of frail patients could make a difference.